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Agle på Inderøy

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English entry

A short presentation of the AGLE farm, located at Inderoey, central Norway.


The name.

Main buildings

The Agle name may have it's origins in the gothic aglus, whitch can be translated to "difficult, hard and poor". It occurs in two locations in Norway, and is used both as names on places (two farms) and as surnames. Our farm lies in the middle of the Trondheims-fiord, in the Inderoey district in North Troendelag. In the 1950's several districts merged into one, and the former district-name was Sandvollan. The other Agle location is in Snaasa, an hour by car from us, a bit further away from the fiord. There, the name is today used on a railway-station, and it can be found on detailed maps. A variation of the name, Aglen, is used on a location in Fosnes district, two hours by car, straight north of Inderoey. Here it's also used as surname.

Today, only a hand-full of people use Agle as their last name in Norway, most likely less then 30 persons. The use of the name on our farm is documented back to 1520. If you are born in USA and carry Agle as your last name, there is a fifty/fifty chance that you've found your roots.

The farm.

The farm is not big, we grow barley on 25 acres. We also have 200 acres with forest, mainly spruce, enaugh to give us the right to a half moose and a roe-deer each authumn. The moose-hunt is organized in bigger units, the deer we take care off ourselves. In norwegian scale, the farm has an average size, in the 1800's the farm fed as much as six familys. The buildings on the farm are all new, the first buildt i 1987. From the mid -60's to 1988, the farm was abandoned, and the land vas drivven together with another farm.

In the late middle-age the farm was owned by Bakke Monestry in Trondheim. The church claimed annual taxes, and times were tough for the farmers. The first private owner was Anders Jensson, who bought the farm from the church in 1766. In 1788 a man named Jorgen Pederssen Geilvoll bought the farm for a sum of 480 'riksdaler'. He and his wife, Dortea Olsdotter Vang Skjevlo, is the origins of me and my family, and Jorgens eldest daughter, Lisbet Jorgensdotter Agle, is the first of my ancestors who use the Agle name. Check out our family tree summary under the "Anetavle"-link.

Their eldest son, Jorgen Olson Vist, brought the Agle name from his mother all the way to me, through four generations of father/son. In our family tree he is known as Joern Kristian Agle, and he is my great-great-grandfather.

During the 1800's the population grew rapidly, and the pressure on the farms increased. A special arrangement was made on some farms. Cotters were given the right to clear small patches of land ( cotter's farms ), most often less then 4 acres, and to build small houses for their familys. The land itself belonged to the main farm, and in return of the right to use the land, these men had the duty to do labour for the landowner. In norwegian they were called 'husmenn', which can be translated to 'man who belongs to the house'. At the most, Agle provided for as much as five such familys, along with the family on the farm. In those days the total size of the cleared land on the farm was less then 15 acres. It's not hard to imagine that life were hard for the cotters, and they brought their familys across the Atlantics in waste numbers during the late 1800's and the early 1900's. It was usual to take the name of the place they were born, and in this way the Agle name was spread over USA, along with some of my early ancestors. Agle was a handy name 'over there', it did not have to be changed and it was easy to spell and prounounse. In many cases, the norwegian names were changed beyond recognizion when arriving USA, and this fact has made problems for many americans who is searching for their roots.

The people.

The farm is drivven by Jan Olav Agle and Hanne Volan. We have two daughters and one son, Maren born in -94 and Guro born in -96, and Jørund born in 2001. He is named after his great-grandfather. We both have jobs outside the farm, and the farming is more of a hobby. Jan Olav is working full-time as a farm worker, and Hanne is working as an assistant at the local elementery school. The farm hasn't had cattle sinse the 1960's, today we only have four rabbits (not much to brag about), and we're planning for some hen's and a rooster.

The younger brother of my grandfather, Arne Agle, emigrated in may 1902 with a ship named "Salmo" on the Allan line. His final destination was Spokane in the state of Washington. His social security # was 546229095. If anyone can give us info concerning his whereabouts we will be very pleased. He was born on the 6. september in 1882, and he died in Los Angeles on the 30. of march 1947.

The addresses, links and comments.

Post address :
Jan Olav Agle
Nessetvg 754
N-7670 INDEROEY
Norway

E-mail : agle@start.no

Stein   The norwegian main entry.
        The frameholder page with all our web-pages.

Stein   Official norwegian census - 1801, 1865, 1875, 1891 og 1900.
        The people on the farm, and the cotter's and their familys.

Stein   Emigrants from Trondheim 1867-1930.
        Everybody who used 'Agle' as their surname.

Feel free to check out the norwegian entry to our home-page. It contains a photo-album with new and old pictures, and a detailed map behind the "Kart"-link on your left. In the "Slektstre"-sites you can find a detailed listing of our ancestors, going back as far as to the 15-hundreds.


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jan.olav@agle.no